OUR MISSION

Friends of Pathways supports a vibrant community by promoting sustainable transportation and healthy recreation in Jackson Hole.

What is the history of the Pathways in Teton County?

  • The first paved pathway in Jackson Hole was constructed in 1996 – four miles of asphalt, 10′ wide, connecting the High School area and neighborhoods with West Jackson along Flat Creek. Fifteen years later, the system has 53 miles of pathway that includes a route connecting Wilson with Teton Village.
  • Grand Teton National Park also approved a pathways system in its transportation plan. Grand Teton has constructed 16 miles of Pathways and has plans for of approximately 40 miles in total.
  • The Old Pass Road is on the Bridger-Teton National Forest, and provides an additional 3.5 miles of pathway.

How long has Friends of Pathways existed?

Friends of Pathways began in 1994.

What is the difference between Friends of Pathways and Jackson Hole Community Pathways?

  • Friends of Pathways is a private, 501(c)(3) non-profit that focuses on promoting and advocating a complete pathway system, safer streets and great trails in Jackson Hole.
  • Jackson Hole Community Pathways is a government department jointly run by Teton County and the Town of Jackson. They plan, design and build pathways and sidewalks in Jackson Hole.

JH Pathways has been a body/mind/spirit life-saver for John. John became disabled 2 years ago. He got a hand-cycle last summer and was finally able to get back outdoors and exercise. It is exhilarating!

– John Zendler (Deborah Clemens)

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Trail Conditions for 6-29-18

This week crews finished up 2 bridges on the History Trail, cleared History, Wilson, West Game, Blacks, worked with volunteers to move lumber to bridge sites, and got trained with Wildflower Watch and Nature Mapping JH.  We had 2 awesome volunteer groups from the Teton Science School and from the Teton Trail Runners who helped us move over 3000 pounds of lumber a mile up the trail to our next bridge sites.  We certainly couldn’t do all the projects on the forest each summer without help from amazing volunteers like them!  The crews also became trained for our Citizen Science project with Wildflower Watch, Nature Mapping JH and the BTNF.  This summer they will help record plant, animal, and recreation data in Cache Creek as part of an ongoing study there.  They also cleared a few dozen trees off of the upper reaches of trail on Pass Ridge.  The next spot to hit will be the Skyline Trail on Monday!  We are excited to get up there after it opens up on Sunday and we hope you go up for an adventure as well!